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Top Myths About Senior Assisted Living

senior assisted livingDeciding to move into a senior assisted living community, or to move your loved one into a community, is a difficult decision to make. While communities do everything in their power to help seniors feel at home and maintain their independence, there are many myths about senior assisted living communities that can unnecessarily prevent some families from making a move. Here are the most common myths about assisted living communities:

Myth: Seniors Living in a Community Home Lose Their Independence

Reality: You’ll have your own space. Assisted living communities give you your own apartment with a separate entrance and a lock on the door for security and privacy. You can furnish the apartment any way that you like, just like you can in any other home.

Myth: Living in an Assisted Living Community is Like Living in a Hospital

Reality: Assisted living residents must be fairly independent to move into the community. Many people fear moving into an assisted living community means they’ll be surrounded by people who are sick or dying, but the senior homes are not hospice care. Instead,  assisted living communities offer a place for seniors to maintain an active, high-quality of life throughout your senior years. People who wait to look for an assisted living community until after they’ve experienced a stroke or fall or some other sudden life change, are unlikely to be admitted into an assisted living facility.

Myth: Moving Away From Home and into an Assisted Living Community Means There is No One to Help Out

Reality: There is usually more help available at an assisted living community than at home. While an assisted living center may be further away from family members, the communities are designed with built-in safety and a 24-hour staff to help out in case you need something. In fact, most people find the access to help available in the community is faster and more consistent than calling family members for help.

Myth: Living in an Assisted Living Community Means You Can’t Have Outdoor Hobbies

Reality: Gardening and other outdoor activities are encouraged. Some seniors fear leaving their own home and moving into an assisted living community means they won’t have a yard in which to garden. Most communities offer gardening space in addition to a wide range of activities for residents including fitness programs, book clubs, off-site field trips, and board games and cards. The activities ensure no one is isolated while helping seniors maintain an active, healthy lifestyle.

The aging process causes our lives to change in unexpected ways, but an assisted living community is a great option to maintain or improve your quality of life throughout the retirement years.

 

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